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Breast pumping basics

When you are expecting a new baby, it’s normal to have lots of questions about pumping. It can feel like getting a breast pump for your milk is a top priority! Whether you plan to breastfeed/bodyfeed, exclusively pump and bottle feed or are not sure what your feeding plan will look like yet, having a pump available after your baby is born can be really helpful. In fact, most insurance companies will cover the cost of a double-electric pump and for those who end up needing a stronger hospital-grade pump—you can usually obtain one from a local hospital, pharmacy or lactation consultant’s office. In addition to having access to an electric pump, many nursing parents also like to have a hand pump like the Hakkaa or Elvie Curve. Finally, it is important to note that often the most effective and comfortable way to express milk is with your own hands. Hand expression is the best method for early milk (colostrum) removal, and lots of lactating parents continue to use manual milk expression throughout their nursing journeys!

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Plugged ducts and mastitis

Plugged ducts and mastitis are common conditions that can appear in lactating people. If you’re experiencing a hard, painful spot or lump it could be a plugged or clogged duct.

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The Best Positions for Breastfeeding / Bodyfeeding

Ultimately the breastfeeding position or bodyfeeding position that works best for you and your baby is your ideal position! You may start with one or two positions and as your baby grows you may begin to find many ways to nurse. In any position, remember that your comfort and stability is as important as your baby’s.

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Tips for breastfeeding / chestfeeding with inverted or flat nipples

Many new parents worry that their nipples are not adequate for nursing their new babies. While breastfeeding/chestfeeding with flat and inverted nipples can be more difficult, especially if your baby also has challenges achieving a deep latch, nipple size and shape may be less of a concern than a parent may have anticipated. With ideal latch and positioning support, many people can nurse their babies just fine, despite non-protruding nipples. It might be reassuring to remember that babies latch onto the areola, not just the nipple and that they can even “pull” an inverted nipple out with good sucking.

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5 weaning tips from a lactation consultant

There are many reasons a nursing parent may decide to stop breastfeeding or pumping. It can feel like a big decision or just a natural next step, but no matter why you are choosing to wean, it is really important to protect your health (both physical and mental) during the process. It might be comforting to remember that all nursing parents do eventually wean and that the body is designed for the transition.

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All things related to tongue-tie part 1

Are you experiencing pain while nursing? Cracked nipples? Super long or very short feedings? Slow weight gain? Shallow latch? Challenges with bottle feeding? Gassy/acid-reflux baby? Possibly combined with slow weight gain for your baby? Tongue-tie might be the cause of the problem. Medically known as ankyloglossia, this condition, present at birth, can restrict the tongue’s range of motion so it may interfere with compression and milk removal.

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How to use a nipple shield for breastfeeding

A nipple shield is a flexible silicone nipple that is worn over the mom’s nipple while she nurses. When should a nipple shield be used?
– Nursing with inverted or flat nipples:
Nipple shields are helpful for people with shorter, flatter, or inverted nipples, making the latch difficult for the baby. Feeding through the shield helps draw the nipple out, to make it easier for your baby to latch onto the breast.
– Breastfeeding a premature baby:
Nipple shields are also useful for some smaller or premature babies who haven’t fully developed their ability to suck and have difficulty latching on to the breast. A nipple shield can help a preemie create suction and position the nipple in a way they may not yet be strong enough to do themselves.

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How to work with a Virtual Lactation Consultant

Even before the pandemic shifted our entire lives to Zoom, lactation consultants have utilized telemedicine to reach families in the comfort of their own homes. For many of us, all our training, experience and continuing education allows us the ability to assess and support families with expert care–even remotely. Seasoned lactation consultants have witnessed so many babies nurse and feed. We have seen many cases of damaged nipples and mastitis, and we have supported countless families in meeting their goals and overcoming challenges. Our experience means we know exactly what we are looking for when a three day old newborn latches or when a nursing parent is healing from an infection.

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Black Breastfeeding Week: A celebration, discussion & Q&A with LaShanda Dandrich, IBCLC.

Black Breastfeeding Week was started by Kimberly Seals Allers, Kiddada Green, and Anayah Sangodele-Ayok to highlight the unique challenges and triumphs of being Black and breastfeeding. This year, their theme is Revive, Restore, Reclaim. Jada Shapiro, boober founder, talked with LaShanda Dandrich, IBCLC (International Board Certified Lactation Consultant) of Uptown Village Cooperative about what care does and should look like for Black birthing parents, how to reduce lactation disparities rooted in bias, lactation myths and facts, and so much more.